What’s in a Name

English follows)
今度のシングルは、Rie fuではなくRié名義でののリリースになるが、なぜ別の名前を使うことにしたのか、真面目に書いてみたい。
Rie fuという名前を思いついたのはデビューの少し前のこと。本名の船越里恵は画数が多くてポップじゃないな〜、英一郎っぽいかな〜、などとスタッフと話していたとき、歌詞を書くときにサインしていたRie fu.が目に止まった。爽やかな風の流れのようでいいね〜、とすぐにこのアーティスト名義に決まった。

My new single is to be released under the artist name Rié, not Rie fu. I’m going to explain why;
Since my real name, Funakoshi, wasn’t really pop and there was another TV melodrama actor who had the same surname, I didn’t think the name was suitable for the style of my music. So it simply got abbreviated to fu.

話は変わるが、小学生の時にアメリカに住んでいた時、Rie という三文字を、現地の人たちは誰も正しく発音することができなかった。それは、英語圏でieと綴ると「イー」か「アイ」の音になってしまうからだ。つまり「リー」か「ライ」としか発音できなかったのだ。
そこで今回英語圏での楽曲リリースにあたり、Beyoncé とかcaféで「エ」の音を示すéを使うことにした。

Changing the subject, I remember my first struggle living in the U.S as a kid was that nobody could pronounce my first name correctly. It’s just three letters, but “ie”only reads as “ee”or “eye”, whereas the right pronunciation is actually “Ree-ay”, like that last “ey ” sound in café or Beyoncé—which explains the accent on Rié.

そしてfuの部分。これは最近知ったことなのだが、ネット上のアーバンディクショナリーによると、 fuは捉えようによってはいかがわしい意味もあるようだ。もちろんおもむろに誰もが聞いたら連想することではないかもしれないが、英語圏を対象にしていると、様々な捉え方をする人がいるかもしれない。
そんなこんなで Riéになったわけでした。

ここからが一番伝えたいこと—
前回のブログでも書いたように、日本とイギリス(もしくは欧米)ではそれぞれ全く異なるマーケット、それに付随する音楽性、カルチャー、感性が関わっている。イギリスのように新たな環境で音楽の挑戦をしたいと思えたのは、他でもない、今までRie fuとしての音楽を応援して下さってきた方たちのサポートのおかげだ。だからこそ、新たなアーティスト名義、より広いマーケットを意識した音楽性を追求していくと同時に、今まで日本で作ってきた音楽のスタイル、活動の一貫性も大事にしていきたい。今年も日本でのライブ企画が進んでいて、Rie fu名義でも曲作りを続けている。
Rie fuもRiéも、創作に対して忠実に向き合っていきたいと思っているので、引き続きあたたかく見守っていただけたら光栄だ。
And then the fu part. This is something I discovered recently, but according to the urban dictionary, fu has a somewhat slang connotation in some parts of the UK. It’s not an obvious one, but targeting an English audience would mean that there could be variety of interpretations.

So this is how I ended up with the name Rié.

Now here is the most important thing I want to convey—
Globally and culturally, there are different styles of music appealing to broader audiences; For example, referring to my previous blog, the Japanese music scene is orchestrated while Western market is the wildlife jungle. Therefore, I wanted to challenge myself in amongst the global and wider audience. My purpose is always to maintain loyalty and respect the choices of sincere and supportive followers of Rie fu over many years. In both names I fully intend to stay true to my art and keep on producing the best music I can in both languages and cultural styles.

From Japan, Singapore, to the UK—the road to a “single”シングルリリースまでの、長い道のりまとめ

English follows)
ついに来週、イギリスでファーストシングルのリリースが決まった。

ちなみに日本では新作のリリースは、1ヶ月前ぐらいから告知スタートする場合がほとんどだが、こちらではシングルの場合は一週間前、もしくは前日などにいきなり発表することが多くなってきているようだ。すぐに試聴できるメディアが溢れているからこそ、リリースの発表してすぐにオンラインで聴いたり購入したりするタイムラグをなるべく短くしようという意図のようだ。

一曲のリリースにたどり着くまであまりにも長かったので、ここでその過程を振り返ってみようと思う。

4年前に人生を変える出来事があった;それはどんな女性にとっても特別な、結婚ということ。旦那さんは、子供を産んで家庭に入る前に、私の人生でやり残したことがあるのではないかと言ってくれた。英語の歌詞を歌い、洋楽に影響を受けてきた自分にとって、英語圏での音楽活動は自然とずっと思い描いていた目標だった。
当時住んでいたシンガポールは、年中夏の楽園で、まさに赤ちゃん連れのママたちには理想的な環境だった。そこにターゲットを絞って、ベイビーキッズライブなどをやってみたが、ディズニーやジブリの歌を歌えるのは自分以外にもたくさんいる。そんな常夏生活の中で、温室のような壁を感じてしまった。そして中国やインドネシアなどのアジアツアーという貴重な経験を経て、新たな環境に挑戦してみたくなった。

I am finally releasing a first single in the UK.

Four years ago, a life-changing thing happened; marriage. This sounds familiar—but my husband, instead of expecting me to devote the next 18 years of my life to kids and housework, encouraged me to do otherwise. He believed in my talent and artistry, and changed his job to move to the UK to pursue my music career.
In the first year of our marriage, we lived in Singapore. Summer all year round, this tropical country was an ideal place to raise babies. All my friends were either pregnant or pushing buggies, and I even did a baby-kids gig, singing Disney songs. But then I realized that anyone can sing Disney songs. After touring Asia for the first time, discovering 2000 fans in China that I was never aware of, my ambition grew even stronger to expand the field in which I explore my potential as an artist. My husband made yet another big commitment by re-locating to the UK, the place where he swore never to return after having a traumatic past back home.

そこからまた旦那さんが大きな貢献をしてくれた。勤めている会社のイギリス支社に自ら転勤を希望してくれたのだ。彼は、家族との辛い過去やトラウマから、20年前に彼の母国であるイギリスを出てから、もう二度と戻らないと決めていた。だからこそ、これは簡単ではない、大きな決断だった。

2016年の春、ちょうど一年前にイギリスに移住した。
当初は、翌月ぐらいに何かしらリリースできるだろうと安易な考えを持っていたが、その考えは甘かった。
日本の音楽業界と違って、イギリスではレーベルや事務所側がアーティストを「育てる」という概念が全くといっていいほどない。極端な例えだと、日本では無垢な子犬を拾ってきて芸を教えるのに比べて、イギリスでは、野生で暴れている獣を見つけてその獲物にあやかろうというようなものだ。つまり自力で実績を積んでから初めて、レーベルや事務所が興味を持ってくれるのだ。特に今はネット上で色々自力でやりやすい分、野生の世界での競争率も激しい。
そこで決めたのがセルフリリースという手段だったが、ただセルフリリースしただけでは誰も見向きもしない。オンラインの音楽サイトと繋がりを持つPR会社との連携が必要だ。私が一緒にやりたいと思ったPR会社とのミーティングをセッティングするだけで1ヶ月近くかかってしまい、さらにそこから何段階かステップがあった。これが1年間の過程である。
①プロモーションしていくにあたって、アーティストのストーリーが大事。音楽ジャーナリストと会う(ドタキャンを繰り返され、2ー3ヶ月も先延ばしにされる)
②ミュージックビデオを作る→完成したものの、インパクトがいまいち薄く、作り直し。
③クリスマス休暇→ターキーと共にイギリス人の脳みそもローストされ、仕事停止。
④一時帰国時に、日本の映像プロダクションにアプローチ。自分のアイデンティティーを生かす映像は、東京とロンドンという2つの街をフィーチャーすることだと気付く。
⑤素晴らしいビデオが完成。現地の評判も良く、ディストリビューションが決まり、PR会社もついに始動。

→今ココ

その間にイギリス人の仕事の仕方、音楽業界の仕組み、日本との常識の違い(=日本の素晴らしさ)を学ぶことができた。そして、セルフリリースリリースにおいて大事なことは何か、何をすべきかのヒントも沢山得られた気がする。それらは追って紹介していく。
In the spring of 2016, exactly a year ago, we moved back to the UK.
At that time, I thought I could just release something a month later, but it wasn’t that easy at all.
The biggest difference between the labels/managements in Japan and in the UK is the artists’ position; in Japan, labels/managements nurture and train the artists, like taking up an innocent puppy and training them to do tricks. Whereas in the UK, labels/managements spot a wild wolf(or tiger, or whatever) that’s already on top of its game, and take their share of prey.
This example is quite extreme, but coming from a totally different market, it took a while to get used to the ‘wildlife’.
The decision I made was to self-release to begin with, working with PR. This was the one-year process that followed;

1.Story of the journey; meeting a music journalist
2.music video; trial and error
3.Christmas break; Brits’ brains get pickled along with pudding, stopping all activity
4.Realized that the best way to present my identity is to show two cities, London and Tokyo. Approached a Japanese video production company, video shoot in these two locations.
5.Outcome as a brilliant video. PR and distribution finally getting on track.

It took much longer than I expected, but during the process, I’ve learned so much about the UK music business, how people work, and differences from Japan. Most importantly, I gained numerous hints on how to survive as a Japanese artist in the UK, and the best is yet to come.

The Domino Effect

(English follows)

イギリスでは先週末からサマータイムの時期になった。
サマータイムとは、日照時間が長くなる季節に時計の針が一時間早送りされることで、遅い時間でもより明るくなるということだ。三寒四温ながらも、町中では春の予兆が見られて来た。
ここ最近はすっかり田舎暮らしに馴染んで来ている。去年の今頃は早くロンドンに引っ越したくてうずうずしていたが、今ではロンドンに出ることはあっても、電車でこの町に戻ってくると、澄んだ空気が身に染みるようになった。

何よりも、四季の変化が五感を通して味わえるのが田舎暮らしの最大の魅力だ。
雨上がりの若葉や刈ったばかりの草の香り、深まっていく鮮やかな緑色、そして春を知らせる鳥の華やかな合唱。暗く長い冬が明けていくように、周りの環境にもやっと光が見えて来た。

イギリスでの音楽活動の模索は、一歩進んで二歩下がるという具合で進んで来た。日本の常識に慣れてしまうと、連絡の滞り、スケジュールのドタキャン、そのくせに請求だけは一人前、などというイギリス人の自己中心的な特徴を掴むだけでもかなりの時間と経験が必要だった。それでもサポートしてくれる方に恵まれ、そのおかげで具体的なリリースプランがやっと話が進んで来た。その過程はこのへんで詳しく書いているが、『歯が痛くなった』という理由で音楽ライターとの取材を何ヶ月も先延ばしにされたり、しまいにはリリースの予定が伸びに伸びまくって一年も経ってしまったりと、かなり忍耐力を試されてきた。

とはいえ一年ただボーッとしていたわけではない。

これはどんな『音楽活動』でも言えることだが、リスナーとしてはアーティストが表に出ていない期間、「〇〇何やってんだろー最近見ないねー」程度の見解だと思う。しかし、実際はこの表に出ていない準備期間が一番大事なのだ。リリースには制作やレコーディング、ツアーにはリハーサルと企画の期間があってこそ成り立つように、この期間の地味で綿密な作業こそが活動の醍醐味なのだ。

そのわかりやすい例えが、「ドミノ倒し」。

ドミノの駒を並べる作業って、すっごく地味。慎重に、一つ一つ並べていく。音楽活動に例えると、この一つ一つの駒は、曲作りだったり、プリプロダクション、レコーディングまでの過程、アーティスト写真やミュージックビデオの企画、撮影、協力してくれる媒体とのコネクション作り(これには何ヶ月も交渉が必要)などだ。大事なのは、途中で倒してしまわないことだ。今の時代では曲ができれば3日後には世界中でデジタルリリースができる。でもそれをすぐやってしまうのは、ドミノの駒を2、3個並べたところで倒してしまうようなことだ。できることなら、なるべくたくさんの駒を並べきりたい。なるべく長く多くの連鎖反応が起こるように。準備が整ったら、あとははじめの駒を倒すだけだ。「リリース」や「ツアー」などの表向きの活動は、このはじめの駒の一押しのようなものなのだ。

一年も準備期間があったのにはこのような理由がある。その中では、「ただ相手の連絡を待つ」という拷問のように怠惰な期間もあったが、いつでもまわりに振り回されずに自分ができることはある。その状況を逆手に取ることだ。だからここ最近で作っている曲の多くは、そんなフラストレーションをテーマにしている。歌詞の皮肉度にさらに磨きがかかる。

はじめの駒を一押しできる時まで、あと少し。

Lining up a long row of domino pieces requires patience and time. But once all the pieces are aligned, all you need to do is press that first piece and the domino effect begins. An artist’s activity, in my opinion, resembles such act. All that’s on the surface of a so-called artist’s activity, such as releasing records and touring, are only that one poke at the first domino piece. Most of the work and effort is in lining up those pieces, which is not glamorous at all. Every record release is built upon songwriting, pre-production and then recording, mixing, mastering, amongst many other additional work that has to be done. It’s not a straightforward process either. You might accidentally knock down some domino pieces before its finished, and you have to lay them out all over again.

One thing I can say is that none of this process is wasted, because the longer the line is, the stronger the domino effect becomes. And it’s that chain of reaction that we want to create, not just a one-off thing.

At the moment, I’m almost finishing lining up all those dominos, waiting for that moment to start the chain of reaction. It took a whole year; much longer than I thought. I moved to the UK to pursue my music career, and nothing happened (on the surface) for a year. So I wrote songs about it. It’s full of irony and sarcasm, a raw depiction of what I have observed as a Japanese singer songwriter in the UK. And I have to say, they sound pretty cool.

Two Cities

(English follows)

 

ロンドンと東京、私にとって大切な2つの街。

渋谷の交差点に立てば学生時代を思い出して懐かしくなるし、夜のビッグベンのあたたかいオレンジ色を見れば、留学中にこの明かりに癒されたことを思い出す。東京ではごく当たり前に通り過ぎていたネオン、電車、コンビニ、自販機、そんなものが、ロンドンに住んでみてからは、近未来映画のセットのように観えるようになった。視点というのは、離れる程、全体像がつかめて新鮮な感覚を持つ事が出来る。海外から日本を観てみると、良いところばかり浮き彫りになってくる。そして日本がどんどん好きになる。

そこでたどり着いたミュージックビデオのアイディアは、私にとって大切なそんな2つの街をテーマに映像を作るという事だった。

Tokyo and London are the two cities that define who I am. When I stand on the Shibuya crossing, where I used to pass by everyday as a student at a nearby school, I feel a sense of reminiscence. When I see the warm orange light of Big Ben in the evening, I feel a sense of comfort, the same feeling I got when I was an art student, living on my own for the first time at 18. The neon, trains, convenience stores, vending machines of Tokyo all remind me of a futuristic movie set. The further you go, the better perspective you get with refreshing viewpoint. That’s how Japan becomes more and more attractive for me over the years of living abroad.

Those thoughts lead to an idea of making a music video of these two incredible cities.

2つの街をどこでもドアで行ったり来たりすること。簡単ではないこの企画だが、とても幸いなことに、協力してくださる日本のプロダクションとのご縁があった。わざわざロンドンまで飛んでいただき、学生の自主制作映画のように、最小人数でロンドンの隅から隅まで魅力的な絵を求めて歩き回り、その後は私が日本に戻って同じように日本の魅力を追求してシーンを探っていった。観光ショットにならないように気をつけながら、絶妙なローカル感のあるスポットを見つけていった。

何度も書いている事だが、イギリスでは日本の良さを伝えるだけでなく、日本人のクリエイターを紹介するきっかけもつくっていきたい。今回は、そんな素晴らしい映像クリエイターチームと作品が創れて本当に光栄だ。

It wasn’t easy to make a video transition from one city to another. Luckily, I found an amazing production team that agreed to support this project, who traveled all the way to the UK, walking endlessly around London to capture a local spot so that the video wouldn’t look like a tourist movie. Then it was my turn to go back to Japan and do the same.

As much as I want to present myself as an artist outside Japan, I also want to introduce many wonderful talents of Japan along with my music. In that sense, I feel truly pleased to have worked with this talented production team.

Observation of the Grammys 2017 (as a Japanese artist)

It’s every artists’ s dream to win the Grammy. Of course, it’s one of my aspirations as well; to win in the Best Contemporary Urban World Music written in two or more languages category, or something like that (I always like to scroll down to see the really niche categories).

In Japan, not many artists aspire to the Grammys. The popular dreams they have are to play at Budokan(a prestigious venue), or to perform in Kohaku (Annual music TV show on New Year’s Eve). For those Japanese artists who actually do aspire to the Grammys, what drives the aspiration is to be the pioneer—Japanese are such minorities when it comes to being successful outside Japan. (Which leads to the whole story of me and my husband moving to the U.K to pursue exactly that) To set the records straight, there ARE Japanese artists that have won the Grammys in the past, but not as a singer-songwriter. This year, pianist Mitsuko Uchida won as an accompanist, and producer StarRo and Ryuichi Sakamoto(for his Revenant soundtrack)were nominated.

日本のアーティストに将来の目標を聞けば、たいがい武道館や紅白などといった言葉が出て来る。グラミー賞が夢というアーティストももちろんいるが、それを目指す理由は、海外でグラミー賞というまでの認知度で活躍する日本人アーティストがあまりにも少ない中、先駆者になりたいという野望があるからではないだろうか。私もまさにその開拓精神で、旦那さんぐるみでイギリス移住してきた。もちろん過去に日本人のグラミー賞受賞者はいらっしゃるし、今年はピアニスト内田光子さんの伴奏者としての受賞やstarRoさん、坂本龍一さんのノミネートもあった。しかし過去のノミネート、受賞者の中で日本人シンガーソングライターはまだ一人もいない。

Putting that successful-Japanese-artists-are-a-minority issue(NOT political)aside, this is what I thought about this year’s Grammys. I’m no music journalist, just someone in front of a TV watching the show in Surrey blogging her mind;

Adele’s voice. Listening to her performance, I almost forget how the song went,or even the how the pitch was,  all I’m left with is this richness of voice melting in my ears. It’s like how when you meet a truly attractive person(male or female), you don’t even remember what they were wearing, just overwhelmed by their presence and personality.

そんな「海外の第一線で活躍する日本人シンガーソングライターが少なすぎる問題」はさておき、一視聴者として今年のグラミーショーの感想を書いていきたい。

まずはアデルの声。耳に染み渡る贅沢な声。今歌ったのどんな曲だったっけ、とか、ピッチがどうのとか、どうでもよくなってしまうこの感覚。たとえばとても魅力な人(男女問わず)に会った後、その人の印象に圧倒されすぎて、その人がどんな服を着ていたかなど忘れてしまう感覚。

The past few decades, especially the 70’s and the 80’s have left so much innovative music to be remixed in this generation. So rich that even in 2017, nearly all of the songs you hear on the show are recycled essence of those eras; Michael Jackson’s daughter presenting the Weekend, Daft Punk,  Katy Perry with Bob Marley’s son, Bruno Mars…all of them are brilliant artists, but all I heard was reminiscence, nothing innovative at all.

That’s why I get so inspired when I hear a great voice; a voice is timeless, regardless of any generation or era. Adele, Beyoncé, rappers like ATCQ and Chance the Rapper, I love the raw energy of his voice purely praising the Lord. It’s everything singing stands for.

70、80年代は音楽のイノベーションに溢れていたが、ここ数十年は、それらをリサイクル品ばかりが出回っている。今年のグラミー賞のパフォーマンスでも、マイケルジャクソンの娘に紹介されたザ・ウィークエンド、ダフトパンク、ケイティーペリーとボブマーリーの息子、ブルーノマーズ、、どのアーティストも素晴らしいが、あたらしさは何もない。

だからこそ、唯一無二の声に感銘を受ける。声は年代関係ない。アデル、ビヨンセ、トライブ、、チャンス・ザ・ラッパーのまっすぐに神を讃えるゴスペルのエネルギーなんて、歌うことの真髄を表現している。

In a time when music styles are being over-remixed, maybe now is a time to get raw. To tell the story of your own, in a one and only voice, as simple as that.

I went through so many phases in terms of music style, even in just a year of moving to the U.K. But now I’m settling down to simply writing autobiographical songs, from a unique angle, with production that most compliments my voice. I don’t have a diva voice like Adele or Beyoncé, but I’m grateful for my own voice that God gave me, and am determined to make the most of the gift.

音楽のスタイルやジャンルが使い古されている今の時代だからこそ、原点に戻るべきなのかもしれない。自分のストーリーを、自分の声で伝える。誰にも真似できないもの。 イギリスに来てからのたった一年でもたくさんの音楽的スタイルを模索して来たが、今その原点をやっと見つけられた気がする。アデルやビヨンセのようなdiva声はないけれど、持っている声は他の誰にも真似できない。その神様からの贈り物を、最大限に生かすのみだ。

 

Eras of Songwriting Style

A songwriting style is constantly evolving for an artist. It’s almost like a fancier version of a diary, so it might be a bit embarrassing to look back at what was written years ago. That’s why whenever I’m asked what my own favourite song is, I always answer, “the most recent song I had written”.

アーティストにとって、曲作りのスタイルは常に進化している。作る曲は、日記に気取った毛がはえたような存在なので、昔の曲を聴いてこっぱずかしくなることもよくある。だから、自分が作って来た中でどの曲が一番好きかと聞かれれば、必ず「一番最近作った曲」と答える。

I have a theory that for most artists, songwriting styles go through certain stages and eras, that resembles a child growing up. Believe me, having released ten albums, I have gone through all of these stages;

持論だが、多くのアーティストにとって、曲作りのスタイルはとある段階を辿って進化していく。それは子供が成長する過程に似ている。10枚のアルバムをリリースして来た筆者にとって、この過程は身をもって体験したものである。

1.The Innocent Era-This is when you start songwriting for the first time. Obviously, this is the most innocent and pure stage. No pretentious gimmicks, simple and honest yet powerful. That’s why, in a certain way, there’s no greater album than a first album for any artist. The most amazing first albums are filled with articulate and sage words beyond the artist’s young age, because the songs have a pure spiritual energy; after all, songwriting or any art is to be oblivious to ego, and be the pure medium to deliver the words and melody floating somewhere in that euphoric realm where people like Mozart and John Lennon would be sunbathing.

①純朴な時代−初めて曲作りを始めるとき。当然ながら、一番純朴な姿だ。わざとらしさもなく、シンプルで素直、かつ力強い。だからこそ、ある意味、どのアーティストにもファーストアルバムを超えるものは二度と作れない。中でも素晴らしいファーストアルバムは、作り手の若い年齢に関わらず賢く卓越した言葉にあふれている。それは、曲たちに霊的な力が宿っているからだ。曲作りに限らずどんな芸術も、アーティスト自身がエゴを捨てて純粋な媒体となり、モーツアルトやジョンレノンが恍惚と日光浴をしているような異次元の世界の空気を作品に吹き込むことなのだ。

2.The Eager to Please Era-The difference with the first album and the second is that the artist is influenced by feedback and expectation for the next work. You get a certain pressure, both to reproduce the similar quality as the first album, but also to make something new to show progression. It’s a tricky balance, because if you’re too same-y, you would bore the audience, but you also wouldn’t want to put them off with a drastic change. It’s also the era of dilemma between the ‘pure spiritual energy’ and the vulgarity of the human realm such as ‘selling albums’ and ‘radio-friendly songs'(In Japan, there was also a term ‘karaoke-friendly songs’). You try to reference songs that are already popular, analyze chords and song structures, start working with producers who have the ‘current’ sound. It’s like a teenage girl who tries a look that doesn’t suit her to impress her crush, who, typically, isn’t even right for her.

②媚び売り時代−ファーストアルバムと2枚目のアルバムの違いは、前作へのフィードバックと、次作への期待があるということだ。そのプレッシャーは、引き続き同じクオリティーの作品を作ることと、進歩を見せることの両方だ。このバランスは難しい。同じすぎればリスナーに飽きられるし、かといって激変しすぎても引かれてしまう。また、純朴時代の霊的な力と、俗世間の煩悩(「売上枚数」、「ラジオ受け」、日本では「カラオケ受け」などの言葉)が葛藤し合う時期でもある。流行りの曲を参考にしてみたり、コードや構成を分析してみたり、売れっ子のプロデューサーと制作してみたり。まるで10代の女の子が、好きな男の子を振り向かせたくて似合わないメイクや服に身を包むようなものだ。しかもたいてい、その男の子はその子にふさわしくない見当違いな場合が多い。

3.The Rebellious Era-After trying so hard to please the listeners and balancing your initial style vs. innovation, you get somewhat tired. Up to a point where you’d say, “The hell with it, let me do whatever the fuck I want”. It could either end up as an amazingly cutting-edge album or something masturbatory that no one else can’t really understand. This is another teenage stage, the attitude turned to parents and teachers; On the contrary to the previous era, you want to do everything opposite of what they would expect you to do.

③反抗期-聴き手に媚を売るかのように色々な手法を試してみて、初心とイノベーションとの間でもがいた後、どっと疲れが出てくる。そして、もう何も気にせず好きなことやってやる、という気になるのだ。この時代にできた作品は素晴らしく前衛的なものにも、難解な自己満足な作品にもなりうる。これもまた10代の頃のような、先生や親から期待されることの真逆をしてやろうという態度と似ている。

4.The Reminiscent Era- This completes a cycle, only its not a repeat, but an elevation like spiral stairs going up. You look back at the stages you’ve been through and realize how valuable that innocent era was. Growing out of the teenage phase and learning to appreciate the lessons. You’re not obsessed with trying to make hits, but going back to making something that’s purely you. It’s a bit sad to think that even though you have completed a cycle(of different stages in songwriting), you can never go back to that first pure stage. You’ll struggle for a chance to see(hear) a glimpse of that spiritual melody realm, but that moment would come once in a while, as if a curtain blown by the wind briefly shows an outside view, if you keep writing and listening to the good quality music-just like how an athlete would train for years and years.

④懐古時代-ここでひとつの周期が完結する。しかしこのサイクルは決して繰り返しではなく、スパイラルの階段のように上に登っていく。同じことの繰り返しと思えることも、実は一周するごとに少しずつレベルアップしているのだ。今までの段階を振り返り、純朴時代がいかに素晴らしかったかに気づく。10代の反抗期を卒業して、学んできたことに感謝をする時期。売れる曲を作ろうという焦りもなく、純粋に自分らしいものを作ることに集中できる。曲作りの段階を一周したとはいえ、決して初めて曲作りをしたときの自分には戻れないことは少し切ない。あの頃頻繁に訪れていた、「美しい音楽が溢れる異次元の世界」へのアクセスはそう簡単ではなくなる。その代わりに、アスリートのような鍛錬が欠かせなくなる。曲を作り続けること。素晴らしい音楽を聴き続けること。そんな積み重ねで、ふとしたタイミングで、その異次元の世界が、カーテンが風に揺れる窓越しに、姿を見せるのだ。

So after going through all these eras, if you’re a young songwriter who want to make a living out of music, you might be asking,

“Then what am I supposed to do?”

If you only want to be commercially successful, you could stay in the Eager to Please Era; there’re so many successful songwriters who keep on producing hit songs, and being part of the industry machine can be truly fulfilling. You stand at a crossroads; one road leads to entertainment, the other leads to artistic integrity.  The road to entertainment is much better paved and a smooth ride, only it could be a long journey. But who knows, you might one day find yourself wondering off the beaten track ending up in spiritual melody realm after all.

このブログの読者の方の中に、将来ソングライターとして成功したいとお考えの方がいるとして、ここまで読まれて「で、どうすればいいの?」という疑問が浮かんでくるかもしれない。

商業的に成功したいなら、『媚売り時代』にとどまることだ。流行の音を巧みに量産して成功している素晴らしい作家さんはたくさんいるし、音楽産業の一部としてやり甲斐のある仕事だ。分かれ道に立ったとして、ひとつの道はエンターテイメントに、もうひとつの道は芸術的本質へと続いているとする。エンターテイメントの道はきちんと舗装されていてスムーズだが、ヒット曲を生み出すまでは長い道のりかもしれない。だけどその道を選んでも、もしかしたらいつの日か脇道に迷い込んで、気づいたら「美しい音楽が溢れる異次元の世界」にたどり着くかもしれない。

 

 

 

 

Japanese Artist in the UK

(日本語に続く)

In the beginning of my music venture in the U.K, I came across a music lawyer who said

“No way you can succeed as a recording artist in the U.K; being a successful songwriter is already like climbing a steep mountain, but being a successful artist on your own right is like climbing up a cliff.”

He might have been practical, but those things only fire me up to prove him wrong.

During the 10+years working with labels, managements, and publishers in Japan, I’ve learned that (at least in Japan)the industry runs like a well made machine. Working as a songwriter is like being one of the essential parts of the machine, and making a hit would surely be a great fulfillment.

As a self-proclaimed artist, the dilemma between making something that you really want(to make)and something that has larger demand is unavoidable. Making a song based on an established model is the typical form of ‘industry’.

Isn’t art supposed to rebel to that very concept? This is another unavoidable question that I ask my self every single day. I can never say yes to that because as much as I want to make something outstanding, I want to deliver it to as many people as possible.

What I had been doing since I moved to the U.K to pursue my career in music (while all my friends were busy having babies and buying family homes), was relentlessly writing new songs, collecting insights from music industry people, collaborating with local producers, and simply living as a Japanese in a middle-class-white-people-with-pushchairs-and-dogs-dominated countryside town outside London.

That really changed my songwriting style. I began to write about my life, exactly how it is, without trying to appeal to the audience nor to hide honesty. It became clear to me that authenticity is the most unique and strongest viewpoint as an artist, even without trying to think of what has the biggest demand or what would appeal to most people.

Another aspect to consider is the sound; production can really make or break the song. I have so much faith in the creators I work with in Japan, and the aim is to introduce those talents to the U.K. Market as well.

But what I had come to realize was something unexpected. As a country that has spawned generations of multi-cultural artistry and music, I thought the U.K. Music scene would be more accepting to new sound…but all of the reactions suggested that my songs should have a clear sense of genre to suite a familiar format.(i.e. Radio stations)

Each radio stations here have a distinct genre and target demographics, whereas in Japan, a radio station is more based on an area/city (like Tokyo FM, FM Osaka) and the genre of music depends on each programme.

Familiarity might be a key to the British music culture, just like reggae and ska became more prevalent through ska-punk; you can introduce something new by combining a familiar element to the sound.

 

イギリスでの音楽活動の模索の始まりは、音楽弁護士のひとことへの反発だった。
「イギリスでアーティストとして成功したいなんて、無謀。
作家として音楽出版社と繋がり、楽曲提供できるようになるのは大きな山を登るようなことだが、レコーディングアーティストとして成功するのは断崖絶壁を登るようなことだ」と。

彼は現実的なことを言っていただけかもしれない。

作家として活動することは、大きな音楽産業の一部品として働くことだ。
優秀な作家はたくさんいるし、ヒットが生まれればとてもやり甲斐のある仕事だ。

作り手にとって、
求められているもの、需要があるもの
と自分が作りたいもの
とのギャップは避けて通れない葛藤だが、既に流行っているものをモデルにして、あえて需要があるものを作るのはまさに産業の典型だ。
芸術はそういうものにたいする反逆なのではないかと、アーティストのめんどくさいエゴの塊が主張しつつも、せっかく世に送り出すものだから、より多くの人に聴いてもらいたいというのも確かだ。

同世代の友人たちが子育てやマイホームの購入で忙しくしている中、イギリスに引っ越してきてからしてきたことは、ひたすら曲作り、音楽関係の人たちから話を聞くこと、現地のプロデューサーとセッションしてみたり、そしてロンドン郊外の中流階級白人たちがバギーと犬を引き連れるような長閑な田舎町で、日本人として生活することだった。

そんな生活の中で、曲作りのスタイルがかなり変わってきた。
背伸びしていた部分が等身大になり、内気に隠していたものが前に出てきた。誰に聴いてもらうとか以前に、ありのままを見せることが、何よりものオリジナリティだということに気づいたのだ。

曲にとって大切なのは、サウンドだ。アレンジによって、曲が活きてくることもあるし、台無しになることもある。日本で一緒に制作しているチームには絶大な信頼をおいていて、彼らの才能を紹介することは一つの目標だ。

しかし実際にこちらに来て、予想外の事実を目の当たりにした。
様々なクロスカルチャーな音楽が生まれて来たイギリスでは、新たなサウンドが受け入れられやすいイメージがあったが、実は真逆だったのだ。
日本では、ラジオ局は地域ごとに分かれていて、流れる曲のジャンルは番組ごとに違う傾向があるが、イギリスでは局単位でかなりジャンルが細かく決まっている。

「馴染みのある音」がイギリスの音楽シーンの隠れたキーワードなのだ。
スカやレゲエもスカパンクのように白人にも馴染みのある要素を交えたことで、より広まっていった歴史がある。

他とは違うものを提示したいと思ったら、何か少しでも馴染みのある要素を入れることで、それに付随した新しい要素を伝えることができるのかもしれない。

なぜイギリス?Why UK?

(English follows)

18歳で初めてロンドンで一人暮らしを始めたときは、幾度となくこの質問を自分に問いかけていた。
『何でイギリスなんかに来ちゃったんだろう…』

渡英前に妄想を膨らませていたお洒落で英国紳士なイギリスのイメージは、憂鬱な天気と不味い食事、プライドの高い割に怠惰なイギリス人の態度という現実に掻き消され、夢のキャンパスライフとはほど遠いロンドンの大学生活を送っていた。
けれども不思議とこの国では、憂鬱な天気と皮肉家のイギリス人批評家に挑戦するような斬新な芸術家や音楽が誕生している。
そしてイギリス生活に慣れるにつれて、そんな挑発的なインスピレーションが溢れるロンドンという街がたまらなく面白く感じるようになってきた。

I asked myself this many times when I first came to the UK;

“Why the hell did I come to this place…”

The perception of UK as a land of gentlemen in tailored suits and courteous manners was soon replaced by depressing weather and tasteless food, unreliable yet unapologetic services. However, strangely, this country yields innovation and the rising against the dooms of the weather and the cynical critics, manifested in art and music. Something tipped over after a fews months of living in London, and I began to be fascinated by this aggressive approach and inspiration.

今イギリスで音楽活動をスタートさせたいと思ったきっかけは、他でもない人生のパートナーのおかげだ。
パンクで刺激的な70年代の音楽シーンで育ったイギリス人の旦那さんは、私の才能は日本にとどまるには勿体ないぐらい素晴らしいと絶賛してくれた。
自分でそれを認めているわけではないが、人生で一人でもそんなことを言ってくれる人に出会えたことは、才能を持って生まれる以上に幸福なことだ。
彼は2014年から2年間住んでいたシンガポールからイギリスへの会社の転勤を希望してまで、イギリスでアーティストとして成功するという目標への扉を開いてくれた。

The main reason for coming to the UK was the encouragement from my husband. Having grown up in the 70s surrounded by legendary music scenes in his own country, he suggested that I venture outside Japan because my talent could be nurtured. Having such a strong supporter in my life is the luckiest thing. He moved us from Singapore, where we had lived for 2 years, to the UK to open the gates to new possibilities.

この十数年の間で音楽の届け方はソーシャルメディアの存在で大きく変わった。
「今できた歌を誰かに聴いてもらいたい」と思ったらすぐに発信できる時代だ。
そんな今、イギリスの音楽業界を様々な角度から観察し、自分なりの活動方法を模索してきたいと思う。
初めのステップとして決めているのはデジタルシングルのセルフリリース。
楽曲もマスタリングまで完成していて、リリースをサポートしてくれる人たちとの繋がりも少しずつ出来始めている。

In ten years, social media has shifted everything about how we deliver and listen to music. You can deliver a new song instantly, anywhere you are. I aspire to explore these methods and creative process through releasing singles digitally and working with other talents.

08540029

音楽活動の始め方 Part 2―How to start as…part2

(English follows)

デモテープを送ってからデビューまでの間にもまた長い課程があった。
今思うと、この課程がとても大事だった。
まずは、送ったテープを誰が聴くかというところにある。
デモテープを聴くことは試験の採点をするのとは違って正解もないし、歌が上手いほど良いということでもない。
誰かの真似ではなく唯一無二の個性があり、印象的な声とメロディーが耳に残る歌。
これらの判断基準も人によって全く違う―逆に既に人気の歌手に似ていてジャンル分けできるものが売り易いから良いという考えの担当者もいるだろう。

Actually, there was a long process between sending the demo and making the debut. Looking back, this process was the crucial phase; firstly, who listens to the demo is immensely crucial. It’s not like marking a test because there’s no right or wrong, and hitting all the right notes does not necessarily lead to instant recognition. You have to have a unique originality in both voice and the songwriting. Now, people have different perceptions when it comes to things like “unique”, because some think that a “sellable”uniqueness is someone who sounds slightly similar to an already successful artist, making them easier to be categorized and recognized.

私の場合、初めにデモテープを送って連絡をくれた担当者は、私が美大留学も同時に志したいと言うと、
「君みたいな人は沢山いるから」
と無神経に言い放ち、それ以上は進めようとしなかった。(個人的に、この言葉は音楽関係と称する人は絶対に言ってはいけない言葉だと思う!)
それでも音楽の可能性を諦めきれず、2度目にデモテープを送って聴いてくれた担当者。
「君の才能はダイヤモンドの原石だ」
今こうやって書くとなんだか胡散臭く聞こえるが、誠意を持って伝えてくれたこの言葉が私の音楽活動を切り開いてくれた。
自分の音楽、才能に共感してくれる心強いサポーターとの出会い。そこからまた次の段階が始まる。

In my case, the first person who listened to the demo gave me a call and told me, after telling him that I’m planning to go to art school in London, that

“There are millions of people like you”

Personally, I think that anyone who claims to work in the music industry should never say such thing. I couldn’t give up. I sent the tape again, and luckily he had more decency. In fact, his words saved my life;

“Your talent is the diamond in the rough”

If you see it in the text, it might sound trite, but the intentions were sincere. All it takes is one person who believes in you, that gives you the energy to start climbing up those spiral stairs.

まずはデモテープのブラッシュアップ。曲に合ったアレンジを見つけることが大切なプロセスになる。
当時まだたどたどしかった自分のギター弾き語りのラフなデモから、見違えるほどの音源に生まれ変わったときは、始めその印象の違いに驚きつつも感激だった。
そしてアーティストのブランディング。
分りやすく見た目で言えばアーティスト写真。そしてプロフィール、背景、キャッチコピーなど。
棚に並ぶ商品になるという意味では、清涼飲料やブランドバッグと変わらない要素がある。
ただ、まだ音楽活動の右も左もわからない18歳としては、その要素に素直に納得出来ないものがあった。
中身は一切変わらずにただパッケージを綺麗にする為だけのブランディングなのに、むりやり中身まで変えられてしまうのではないかという不安があった。
中身もパッケージも作り込まれているアーティストやアイドルも沢山いるが、自我が強いアーティストほどこれに反発してしまうものだ。
このようなことが原因で、振り返ってみれば自分にとってブランディングはもっと工夫出来たのでは、と思っている。

After that, the demo-department within the music group started brushing up the demos to make it into a product. Branding, artist shots, biography, selling phrase…if it is presented to consumers, music is not dissimilar to any other commercial products like bottled drinks or designer bags.

But as a rebellious 18-year-old, I wasn’t happy with all of that. The bigger the ego, the stronger the refusal to fit into a packaged box. But it’s part of presentation, contents are the same; I wish I had been a bit more understanding of these things.

そしてデビューライブ活動、プロモーション活動が始まり、
ここからが表向きの音楽活動のスタートということになるが、ここまでの課程で道を逸れてしまう人も沢山いる。
思う以上に時間がかかるので、辛抱強さが何より大事だ。
表向きの活動で一番大事なのはもちろん音楽を届ける相手だが、一緒に届けるチームも大切になってくる。
身近なスタッフをはじめ、音楽を届ける媒体を繋ぐ人たちや、家族や友人。

そして今、このプロセスを1からイギリスでスタートさせようとしている。
この決断に至るまでも、また長い道のりだった。

Then it kicked off. Live, promotion, this is where the music activity becomes visible, but so much time and efforts needs to be put into the preparatory stages. You need patience, teamwork, support from family and friends.

I’m starting all this in the UK, and it has been a long journey already.

All worth it, though.

2012tour1

イギリスでの音楽活動の始め方―How to start as a Japanese artist in the UK

(English follows)

このタイトルは今抱えている最大のクエスチョンだ。
そもそもどこから、どうやって始めるのか?
このブログは、イギリスでの音楽活動を模索していく体験をあくまでも個人的な視点や考え方で率直に綴るものであり、数年後の自分に向けた備忘録でもある。

自分にとってこのスタート地点に立つのは初めてではない。
2004年に日本でデビューしてから十数年。
イギリスという新たな環境でまた音楽活動を始めることは、逆戻りしたわけではなく、スパイラルの階段を昇り真上の階にたどり着いたような感覚だ。
そもそも自分はどうやって音楽活動を始めたんだっけ?ふと自分の当時の体験を振り返ってみる。

The title of this article itself  is the biggest question that I have right now. Where do I begin? This blog is a personal journal of exploring the music activities in the UK, to keep a record to remind myself a few years later.

It’s not my first time to be at the starting line of the music venture. It’s been more than a decade since I made a debut in 2004 in Japan, but starting over in the UK doesn’t mean that I’m reverting back, but it’s rather like climbing up the spiral stairs and realizing that I’m directly above where I started. Looking back, how did I begin in the first place?

私がまだ高校生だった頃に曲づくりを始めたのは、ひとつの新聞記事がきっかけだった。
音楽家の千住明さんが書かれていた記事で、
『音楽は、人に聴いてもらって初めて命を持つ』
という言葉に心を打たれ、自分が作ったものに命が宿るなんて!と希望の光が差し込んだようだった。
その頃海外の美大を目指してポートフォリオの作品集を作っていて、(海外の美大は日本と違ってデッザンなど技術的な試験はほとんどなく、ポートフォリオ審査が中心になる)何時間もかけて描く絵画が果たして誰かのためになるのだろうかという葛藤と行き詰まりを感じていた。
そんなときにふと手にしてみたギター。コードも知らずただ音を頼りに、その葛藤の言葉に乗せてメロディーを作っていくことが楽しくて、気付いたら一ヶ月で30曲も曲が生まれていた。

It all started with one newspaper article. It was written by a composer, Akira Senju;

“When music is heard, it comes to life”

These words gave me tremendous hope. At the time, I was preparing a portfolio for art school, and was frustrated by how a drawing or a painting that’s taken hours and days to create will ever influence anyone else. I took up the guitar to take a break from all that, without even knowing what chords are, and found so much pleasure and fun in creating melodies, and came up with 30 songs in one month.

まさに詰まっていた蛇口がひねられ滝のように歌が出てきたのだ。
絵画と違って、複製しても同じ価値をとどけられる音楽。(ライブはまた別として)。
言葉で様々な感情や情景を直接伝えられる歌。
誰かに聴いてもらいたいという一心で、高校の音楽祭で弾き語りをしてみたり、小さなカセットレコーダーでひたすらデモテープを作り始めた。

携帯から(当時は懐かしのiモード)「デモテープ」と検索して一番はじめに出てきたところにこのテープを送ったことがきっかけで、メジャーデビューという素晴らしい幸運に恵まれた。

It was as if the tap had opened; songs came flowing out like a waterfall. Unlike paintings, the value does not diminish even if duplicated (live performance is an exception), and the expressions are more directly conveyed through words, in music.

In the hopes of bringing them to life, I started playing in my high school music festival, and recording a demo in a little cassette tape recorder (circa early 2000s). I searched “demotape” on the bulky foldable mobile phone back then and sent the demo to the top of the search result, which happened to be the label that was generous enough to give me a chance to release my first single in 2004.

これが私の『音楽活動』の始め方だった。
何かの衝動にかられていたようであり、決して、音楽活動をしよう、と思って始めたわけではない。
もしかしたら本当の『音楽活動』とは、その純粋な原点に意味があるのかもしれない。

This was how I started music. It was as if a surge of creative energy started overflowing all of a sudden, and I never intentionally though, “OK, I will start writing music”. After all, maybe “music activity” is all about the innocent and primitive drive.

2006tour2