Japanese Artist in the UK

(日本語に続く)

In the beginning of my music venture in the U.K, I came across a music lawyer who said

“No way you can succeed as a recording artist in the U.K; being a successful songwriter is already like climbing a steep mountain, but being a successful artist on your own right is like climbing up a cliff.”

He might have been practical, but those things only fire me up to prove him wrong.

During the 10+years working with labels, managements, and publishers in Japan, I’ve learned that (at least in Japan)the industry runs like a well made machine. Working as a songwriter is like being one of the essential parts of the machine, and making a hit would surely be a great fulfillment.

As a self-proclaimed artist, the dilemma between making something that you really want(to make)and something that has larger demand is unavoidable. Making a song based on an established model is the typical form of ‘industry’.

Isn’t art supposed to rebel to that very concept? This is another unavoidable question that I ask my self every single day. I can never say yes to that because as much as I want to make something outstanding, I want to deliver it to as many people as possible.

What I had been doing since I moved to the U.K to pursue my career in music (while all my friends were busy having babies and buying family homes), was relentlessly writing new songs, collecting insights from music industry people, collaborating with local producers, and simply living as a Japanese in a middle-class-white-people-with-pushchairs-and-dogs-dominated countryside town outside London.

That really changed my songwriting style. I began to write about my life, exactly how it is, without trying to appeal to the audience nor to hide honesty. It became clear to me that authenticity is the most unique and strongest viewpoint as an artist, even without trying to think of what has the biggest demand or what would appeal to most people.

Another aspect to consider is the sound; production can really make or break the song. I have so much faith in the creators I work with in Japan, and the aim is to introduce those talents to the U.K. Market as well.

But what I had come to realize was something unexpected. As a country that has spawned generations of multi-cultural artistry and music, I thought the U.K. Music scene would be more accepting to new sound…but all of the reactions suggested that my songs should have a clear sense of genre to suite a familiar format.(i.e. Radio stations)

Each radio stations here have a distinct genre and target demographics, whereas in Japan, a radio station is more based on an area/city (like Tokyo FM, FM Osaka) and the genre of music depends on each programme.

Familiarity might be a key to the British music culture, just like reggae and ska became more prevalent through ska-punk; you can introduce something new by combining a familiar element to the sound.

 

イギリスでの音楽活動の模索の始まりは、音楽弁護士のひとことへの反発だった。
「イギリスでアーティストとして成功したいなんて、無謀。
作家として音楽出版社と繋がり、楽曲提供できるようになるのは大きな山を登るようなことだが、レコーディングアーティストとして成功するのは断崖絶壁を登るようなことだ」と。

彼は現実的なことを言っていただけかもしれない。

作家として活動することは、大きな音楽産業の一部品として働くことだ。
優秀な作家はたくさんいるし、ヒットが生まれればとてもやり甲斐のある仕事だ。

作り手にとって、
求められているもの、需要があるもの
と自分が作りたいもの
とのギャップは避けて通れない葛藤だが、既に流行っているものをモデルにして、あえて需要があるものを作るのはまさに産業の典型だ。
芸術はそういうものにたいする反逆なのではないかと、アーティストのめんどくさいエゴの塊が主張しつつも、せっかく世に送り出すものだから、より多くの人に聴いてもらいたいというのも確かだ。

同世代の友人たちが子育てやマイホームの購入で忙しくしている中、イギリスに引っ越してきてからしてきたことは、ひたすら曲作り、音楽関係の人たちから話を聞くこと、現地のプロデューサーとセッションしてみたり、そしてロンドン郊外の中流階級白人たちがバギーと犬を引き連れるような長閑な田舎町で、日本人として生活することだった。

そんな生活の中で、曲作りのスタイルがかなり変わってきた。
背伸びしていた部分が等身大になり、内気に隠していたものが前に出てきた。誰に聴いてもらうとか以前に、ありのままを見せることが、何よりものオリジナリティだということに気づいたのだ。

曲にとって大切なのは、サウンドだ。アレンジによって、曲が活きてくることもあるし、台無しになることもある。日本で一緒に制作しているチームには絶大な信頼をおいていて、彼らの才能を紹介することは一つの目標だ。

しかし実際にこちらに来て、予想外の事実を目の当たりにした。
様々なクロスカルチャーな音楽が生まれて来たイギリスでは、新たなサウンドが受け入れられやすいイメージがあったが、実は真逆だったのだ。
日本では、ラジオ局は地域ごとに分かれていて、流れる曲のジャンルは番組ごとに違う傾向があるが、イギリスでは局単位でかなりジャンルが細かく決まっている。

「馴染みのある音」がイギリスの音楽シーンの隠れたキーワードなのだ。
スカやレゲエもスカパンクのように白人にも馴染みのある要素を交えたことで、より広まっていった歴史がある。

他とは違うものを提示したいと思ったら、何か少しでも馴染みのある要素を入れることで、それに付随した新しい要素を伝えることができるのかもしれない。